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university:courses:alm1k:circuits1:alm-cir-15a [05 Nov 2021 14:43]
Doug Mercer add link to simulation material
university:courses:alm1k:circuits1:alm-cir-15a [05 Nov 2021 14:58]
Doug Mercer [Background Basics:]
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-======Activity:​ DC-DC Boost Converter, For ADALM1000======+======Activity:​ DC-DC Boost Converter ​ADALM1000======
  
 =====Objective:​===== =====Objective:​=====
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 When the current flowing in an inductor is quickly interrupted a large voltage spike is observed across the inductor. This large voltage spike can in fact be useful in some cases. One example is the DC to DC boost converter, which is a circuit that can create a larger DC voltage from a smaller one with very high efficiency. The basic idea is to combine an inductive spike generator with a rectifier circuit, as shown in figure 2. Whenever the transistor is abruptly turned off the voltage at the drain spikes up, the diode D<​sub>​1</​sub>​ is forward biased and current will flow from the inductor to charge up the storage capacitors C<​sub>​3</​sub>​ and C<​sub>​4</​sub>​. When the drain voltage subsequently drops below the voltage on the capacitor, the diode is reverse biased and the output voltage remains constant. Just as in the chapter on AC power supplies, the output capacitor must be sized appropriately to minimize the ripple relating to the current flowing in the load. We will just use a small capacitor here and hence the circuit will not be able to source a large output current. ​ When the current flowing in an inductor is quickly interrupted a large voltage spike is observed across the inductor. This large voltage spike can in fact be useful in some cases. One example is the DC to DC boost converter, which is a circuit that can create a larger DC voltage from a smaller one with very high efficiency. The basic idea is to combine an inductive spike generator with a rectifier circuit, as shown in figure 2. Whenever the transistor is abruptly turned off the voltage at the drain spikes up, the diode D<​sub>​1</​sub>​ is forward biased and current will flow from the inductor to charge up the storage capacitors C<​sub>​3</​sub>​ and C<​sub>​4</​sub>​. When the drain voltage subsequently drops below the voltage on the capacitor, the diode is reverse biased and the output voltage remains constant. Just as in the chapter on AC power supplies, the output capacitor must be sized appropriately to minimize the ripple relating to the current flowing in the load. We will just use a small capacitor here and hence the circuit will not be able to source a large output current. ​
  
-For additional background and simulation material ​on DC-DC converters go to this [[university:​labs:​open_loop_boost_and_buck_adalm2000#​Background|more in depth explanation]].+This exercise will expand ​on these concepts, deriving a converter that “boosts” a low voltage ​to a high voltage. ​ Subsequent activities will close the loop around these circuits and examine loop stability and time-domain response. 
 + 
 +{{page>:university:​labs:​open_loop_boost_and_buck_adalm2000#​Activity 1: An Ideal* Open-Loop Boost Converter Simulation&​footer}}
  
 ====Materials:​==== ====Materials:​====
university/courses/alm1k/circuits1/alm-cir-15a.txt · Last modified: 05 Nov 2021 14:58 by Doug Mercer