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This version (09 May 2012 19:15) was approved by JasonC, jbirnie.

DPGDownloader

DPGDownloader is an application created to communicate with a DPG for quick and efficient high-speed DAC evaluation.

Installation

DPGDownloader is installed as part of the DAC Software Suite. No additional installation is necessary.

Running DPGDownloader

A shortcut will be installed to your Start menu during the installation of the DAC Software Suite. To begin, click on the DPGDownloader shortcut in your Programs menu, typically at Start > Programs > Analog Devices > DPG > DPGDownloader.

The Main Screen

When DPGDownloader is opened, the Main Screen is displayed.

The Main Screen is divided into two sections. The top section allows you to add data vectors to DPGDownloader. The bottom section displays a panel for each attached pattern generator.

To begin, add data vectors to the application (see Adding Vectors.) Once the vectors have been loaded, each pattern generator can be configured, and the vectors can be downloaded into the pattern generator's memory.

Data Vectors

Adding Vectors

Data vectors are added to the main DPGDownloader screen before they can be used with a DPG. This allows the same data to be used for multiple channels and multiple DPGs without duplicating the memory requirements on the PC. Data vectors can be loaded in from an existing file, or they can be generated by the DPGDownloader software directly.

Buttons

Adds a vector from an existing file. See Loading Data Files for more information. Clicking the down arrow will display a list of the last 10 data files that were loaded.
Displays a drop-down list of the available vector generators. See Generating Data Vectors for more information.
Removes the selected vector. The selected vector is highlighted with a border. If the selected vector is from a data file, removing the vector from DPGDownloader will not delete the file itself. The data file can be added back at any time.
Removes all vectors from the list.
Displays both a time-domain and frequency-domain graph of the selected vector(s). See Graphing Vectors for more information.

Selecting Vectors

To remove vector, or to graph a vector, it must be selected. To select a vector, click on its vector number on the left side of each vector. This will cause a colored border to be drawn around the vector, indicating it is selected. To select multiple vectors at once, hold down the Ctrl key while clicking on the individual vectors.

Loading Data Files

To add a data file, click on Add Data File. You will then be prompted to select which file to load. After selecting a valid file, an entry will be added to the Files List area. The item will initially be listed as “Processing”. During this time, DPGDownloader is reading the contents of the data file, and determining certain statistics about the file. Once the file has been read in, the Processing text will disappear.

For each file listed, a Vector Number is displayed on the left. This number is only used to assist you when selecting the files to load into each DPG. The number will change depending on the order in which files are loaded in. The file name of the original data file path, the file format, and number of records (length) in the file are also listed.

For certain file types, a Resolution entry will also be displayed, to the right of the Scaling box. This is used to properly scale an unsigned vector around mid-scale, and when graphing the vector, to properly calculate dB full-scale. Set this to the equivalent resolution of the file. For example, if the file contains values between 0 and 16383, then the file would be 14-bit resolution.

To remove a data file, click on the entry once to highlight it. Once highlighted, click on Remove Selected. To remove all the listed data files, click Remove All.

Supported File Formats

File TypeExtensionMulti-ChannelNotes
Legacy DPG Hex Format.hexNo
Legacy DPG Text Format.txtNo

Example Vector Files

dpg.txt
4337
3448
2257
890
dpg.hex
10F1
0D78
8D1
37A

Generating Data Vectors

Several different vector generation routines are available from within DPGDownloader. They are all available from the Add Generated Waveform drop-down list, which is located to the right of the Add Data File button.

Single Tone

The Single Tone generator creates a simple sine wave vector. Enter the clock frequency of the data going into the DAC, the resolution (number of bits) of the DAC, as well as the desired frequency, amplitude, and relative phase of the sine wave. The generator will always generate vectors which can be looped repeatedly. To ensure contiguous waveforms over multiple loop iterations, the generator will calculate an achievable frequency that is as close to the desired frequency as possible. This frequency will be displayed in the Calculated Frequency box, as well as the number of complete cycles that will be generated in the vector. It may be possible to achieve a calculated frequency exactly equal to the desired frequency. Often, changing the record length is required for this to occur.

If either the Clock Frequency or Desired Frequency is invalid, the box will turn red. A vector will not be available until any red boxes have been corrected.

The “Unsigned Data” option should match the settings in the DAC. Most DAC's can be setup to accept unsigned (binary) or signed (2's compliment) data.

The Single Tone generator can generate a quadrature (complex) tone in addition to the primary (in-phase) tone, by checking the “Generate Complex Data” option. This second (Q) tone is equal in frequency and amplitude to the primary (I) tone, but is 90° out of phase. By default, the Q tone is -90° relative to the I tone. Entering a negative frequency in the Desired Frequency box will cause the Q tone to be +90°.

The “Allow Even Cycle Count” check box allows the user to override the default settings of the tone generator and allow an even number of cycles per vector. This may lead to the appearance of degraded DAC performance, as only a subset of the DAC's full code range will be exercised. This has the effect of distributing the quantization noise over only those codes, resulting in degraded performance. It is highly recommended that this feature not be enabled.

Multi-Tone

The Multi-Tone generator creates vectors that are composed of multiple sine wave vectors. Each tone can have its own frequency, amplitude, and phase. As with the Single Tone generator, the Multi-Tone generator always generates individual tones which will loop properly. In the tone list, the desired frequency and amplitude are listed first. In dark gray, the calculated frequency and number of cycles are displayed. If the tone cannot be generated (for example, the Sample Rate is too low), the tone will appear red in the tone list, and the dark gray text will change to an explanation of why the tone cannot be generated.

Add Tone: Click this button to add a new tone to the tone list.
Edit Selected Tone: Click this button to edit the selected (highlighted) tone.
Remove Selected Tone: Removes the selected tone from the tone list.

When multiple sine vectors are summed together, the possibility for clipping (data out of range) occurs. When clipping is detected, a warning is displayed:

To correct this error, lower the amplitude of the overall vector, or lower the amplitude of the individual tones until the warning message disappears.

The Multi-Tone generator can generate a quadrature (complex) tone in addition to the primary (in-phase) tone, by checking the “Generate Complex Data” option. This second (Q) tone is equal in frequency and amplitude to the primary (I) tone for each individual tone, but is 90° out of phase. By default, the Q tone is -90° relative to the I tone. Entering a negative frequency in the Desired Frequency box will cause the Q tone to be +90°.

The “Allow Even Cycle Count” check box allows the user to override the default settings of the tone generator and allow an even number of cycles per tone per vector. This may lead to the appearance of degraded DAC performance, as only a subset of the DAC's full code range might be exercised. This has the effect of distributing the quantization noise over only those codes, resulting in degraded performance. It is highly recommended that this feature not be enabled.

DC

The DC generator generates a vector in which every element is the value specified in the Value box. The Value can be entered in Decimal or Hex (hexadecimal).

Noise Generator

The Noise Generator generates a vector with pseudo-random noise, by a variety of techniques. Gaussian, Uniform, and White Noise types are available.

Advanced Vector Generator

The Advanced Vector Generator libraries contain several generators for creating vectors that mimic waveforms found in common applications. These vectors go far beyond simple tone testing, allowing for data converter evaluation with spectrum-accurate vectors for many popular waveforms.

Please note: The Advanced Vector Generator is comprised of numerous libraries for different vector types. Every library listed here may not be available in your distribution.

Cable Infrastructure

The Cable Infrastructure Advanced Vector Generator creates spectrum-accurate vectors which can be used to simulate a DOCSIS signal.

To begin, select the Standard for which you are trying to simulate. This will set the Symbol Rate and QAM constellation size appropriately. To set either of these manually, select Other as the Standard. Then select the Sample Rate. This will be fixed to an integer multiple of the Symbol Rate. Select the appropriate Resolution for the DAC which will be playing out this vector.

Adding Channels

Add channels to the vector by adjusting the parameters in the Add Channels section on the bottom of the panel, and click the Add Channels button. The number of channels available in a single vector is limited only by the available memory and processing power of the PC, however most users will find that a channel count of several hundred or more becomes cumbersome to work with.

To add a single channel, enter the Center Frequency and Relative Amplitude, while leaving the Number of Channels at 1. This will add one channel to the vector. This can be done as many times as needed to add all the required channels. The Relative Amplitude is the amplitude of the current channel relative to the other channels. For example, if all channels are at 0dB, they will all have the same amplitude. The absolute amplitude, as seen at the output of the DAC, will depend on the relative amplitude of each channel, the number of channels, the digital backoff (see below), and the transfer function of the DAC itself.

To save time, if a number of channels are to be added to the vector that are at a constant spacing from each other, the Number of Channels and Spacing options can be used. For example, to generate an 8-carrier vector, with each channel 6MHz away from the previous channel, select 8 for the Number of Channels, and 6MHz for the spacing. In this case, the Center Frequency is the center frequency of the first channel.

Each channel can be edited and deleted individually, regardless of if it was added individually or as a group.

Once a channel is added, the Actual frequency is displayed after the desired Center Frequency. This frequency is the closest frequency that could be achieved given the sample rate. Also displayed is the number of points the vector will produce. This determines how much memory the pattern generator will need in order to play out this vector, as well as indicate approximately how long the vector will take to generate and download.

Editing Channels

The Center Frequency and Amplitude of each existing channel can be edited by double-clicking on the respective entry in the list of channels. For example, to edit the Amplitude, double click on Amplitude: or the value after it in the list. This will allow the value to be edited. When you are done editing the value, click outside the edit box.

To remove a channel, single-click on the channel to highlight it, then press the Delete key (keyboard) or right-click and select Delete.

Double-clicking on the channel type (left-most entry per line) will bring up the properties box for that channel. Advanced options for the channel can be adjusted here.

The order that the channels are displayed in the list can be altered with the up and down arrows on the right side of the list. Highlight a channel, and press the up arrow or down arrow to move the channel. This will not affect the vector generation; it is for display purposes only.

Digital Backoff

When the vector is generated, the signal will be scaled such that the peak of the time-domain signal is at the full scale of the DAC (a value determined by the Resolution option). This ensures that the vector will never clip or roll over. To lower the amplitude of the vector beyond full scale, the Digital Backoff option can be used. This scaling is applied to the vector before it is sent to the DAC.

Note: Some DACs have a digital and/or analog backoff which is independent of this function. This vector backoff is applied before any backoff that the DAC may perform.

Generating the Vector

When the resulting data vector is requested, either to graph or to download to a pattern generator, it will be generated automatically. After it has been generated, the Peak to Average ratio (crest factor) will be displayed above the list of channels. Note that changing the channels will not update this value until the vector is generated again.

DOCSIS 3.0

Beyond the standard Center Frequency and Amplitude options, DOCSIS 3.0 channels have a number of other properties that can be adjusted. Double-clicking the DOCSIS 3.0 text in the channel list will bring up the Channel Properties box:

From here, a number of items can be viewed, and several items can be altered.

PropertyDescription
NameThe internal name of the channel. This is displayed for debugging use only.
Number of SymbolsThe calculated number of symbols in the vector. This is determined automatically.
Modulation RateThe Modulation Rate is specified in the main window, but is displayed again here.
Center FrequencyThe Center Frequency of the channel. Changing this value will update the main window as well.
InterpolationThe interpolation factor used internally to arrive at the specified sample rate.
Power LevelThe relative amplitude of the vector. Changing this value will update the main window as well.
AlphaExcess Bandwidth, specified by the DOCSIS standard for the configuration you are generating
ModulationThe modulation routine used, specified by the DOCSIS standard for the configuration you a generating.
SourceThe source of the data which is modulated to form the DOCSIS channel. This is always set to Random.

Wireless Infrastructure

The Wireless Infrastructure Advanced Vector Generator creates spectrum-accurate vectors which can be used to simulate a variety of carries commonly used in the Wireless/Cellular industries.

Multiple carrier types can be combined in a single vector. For example, one vector could contain both a GSM carrier and a WCDMA carrier. Multiple carriers of the same type are also allowed (for example: multi-carrier GSM).

Note: The vectors created with this tool are spectrally accurate. However, in most cases they are not complete implementations of a given standard, and thus may not demodulate properly when received by a standards-compliant receiver or test equipment. They are provided as a way to quickly evaluate a signal chain's analog performance in a lab environment.

Adding Carriers

Adding carriers to the vector can be accomplished multiple ways. Carriers can be added individually, or they can be added as Carrier Groups. When carriers are in a group, they can easily be frequency shifted and scaled, without adjusting each individual carrier.

Single Carriers

To add a single carrier to the vector, enter the Center Frequency and Relative Amplitude, and select the air standard, leaving the number of carriers at 1. Click Add Carriers, and the carrier will be added to the list.

Carrier Groups

If multiple carriers of the same type, with equal spacing between them, are to be added to the vector, adjust the No. of Carriers to the desired number of carriers, and adjust the Carrier Spacing. The Center Frequency in this case is the center frequency of the group of carriers.

Editing Carriers

The Center Frequency and Amplitude of a carrier or carrier group can be edited by double-clicking on the current value displayed in the list of carriers. Advanced properties for each carrier can be edited by double-clicking on the carrier type (GSM, CDMA, etc) in the carrier list.

When editing the center frequency of a Carrier Group, the center frequencies of each carrier within the group will be shifted so that the difference between the carrier's center frequency and the group's center frequency is maintained.

When editing the amplitude of the Carrier Group, the amplitude of each carrier in the group will be shifted by the same amount. The difference (in dB) between the group's amplitude and the individual carrier's amplitude will be maintained.

The individual carriers within a group can be edited in the same way that a single carrier is edited.

Carrier Order

The first carrier in the list is considered the Primary Carrier. This carrier is used to define many of the parameters of the overall vector, including the length of the data vector and the allowable sample rates. This should always be the carrier that is considered “most important.” Subsequent carriers may be automatically windowed and resampled so that they fit properly into the vector length determined by the primary carrier. When this occurs, “Windowed” and/or “Resampled” will appear in light gray just to the right of the carrier's settings (see image above).

To change the order of the carriers, select the carrier to move, and use the up and down arrow buttons on the right side of the carrier list.

Digital Backoff

When the vector is generated, the signal will be scaled such that the peak of the time-domain signal is at the full scale of the DAC (a value determined by the Resolution option). This ensures that the vector will never clip or roll over. To lower the amplitude of the vector beyond full scale, the Digital Backoff option can be used. This scaling is applied to the vector before it is sent to the DAC.

Note: Some DACs have a digital and/or analog backoff which is independent of this function. This digital backoff is applied before any backoff that the DAC may perform.

Generating the Vector

When the resulting data vector is requested, either to graph or to download to a pattern generator, it will be generated automatically. After it has been generated, the Peak to Average ratio (crest factor) will be displayed above the list of carriers. Note that changing the carriers will not update this value until the vector is generated again.

WCDMA/CDMA2k

The WCDMA and CMDA2k Carrier Properties screens provide the option to override many of the parameters used to generate a vector.

General Carrier Properties

In addition to the Center Frequency and Power Level (Amplitude) options, the Spreading Factor, Interpolation, and Windowing mode can be changed. The Chip Frequency is provided for reference only. It is fixed by the selected standard (3.84MHz for WCDMA, 1.2288MHz for CDMA2k). The Number of Symbols is also provided for reference only, as it is calculated automatically. It is recommended that the Spreading Factor, Interpolation, and Windowing not be changed for optimal performance.

Users

A WCDMA/CDMA2k carrier contains a number of user code slots. The Users section of the carrier properties allows these user codes to be configured. Up to 223 user codes can be added at once. For the most realistic peak-to-average ratio (crest factor), at least 12 users should be placed across the full 32 to 255 code range.

Adding Users

To add a new user, click the Add User button. This will create a user with a randomly selected code, and add it to the end of the user list. It can then be edited just as any existing user can.

Editing Users

To edit an existing user, click on the user in the user list. The properties on the right side of the screen will then be updated to reflect the settings of the selected user.

PropertyDescription
CodeThis is the code assigned to the selected user. There should not be two users with the same code.
ModulationOffers a choice of different modulation techniques for this user:
* QPSK - Quadrature Phase-Shift Keying
* 8QAM - Quadrature Amplitude Modulation, with 8 symbols
* 16QAM - Quadrature Amplitude Modulation, with 16 symbols
* 32QAM - Quadrature Amplitude Modulation, with 32 symbols
SourceThis determines what data is used fed to the modulation. This is always set to Random.
Deleting Users

To delete an existing user, select the user in the user list, and click Delete User.

GSM

The GSM Carrier Properties screens provide the option to override many of the parameters used to generate a vector.

The Power Level (Amplitude) and Center Frequency are the same as those that can be edited on the main screen. The Interpolation is computed automatically.

Modulation

The following modulations are available for a GSM carrier:

GMSKOriginal GSM modulation
8PSKGSM EDGE modulation
Timeslots

Each GSM carrier contains 8 timeslots, labeled 0 through 7. For each timeslot, a Source can be specified, which determines what data is given to the modulation routine to come up with the carrier. The source is always a pseudo-random data generator. When using the random source, the Seed can be specified to ensure that the “random” data generated is consistent each run.

LTE

The LTE (Uplink/Downlink) Carrier Properties screens provide the option to adjust many of the parameters used to generate a vector.

The Power Level (Amplitude) and Center Frequency are the same as those that can be edited on the main screen. The Interpolation is computed automatically.

Transmission Bandwidth

The following bandwidths are supported, with the corresponding Resource Block (RB) count:

1.4MHz6RB
3.0MHz15RB
5.0MHz25RB
10MHz50RB
15MHz75RB
20MHz100RB

Changing the transmission bandwidth will change the vertical (y-axis) scale on the payload graph.

Cyclical Prefix

Both Normal and Extended options are supported. This affects the number of symbols per slot, with Extended having one less slot than Normal.

ACLR

This option adjusts the trade-offs between achieving better ACLR versus better EVM.

Enabled Slots

This sets the horizontal (x-axis) on the payload graph, and determines how many slots will be generated in the vector. A lower slot count will improve the time it takes to generate a vector.

Payload Graph

This graph provides a visual representation of each frame's payload. Payloads can be added by clicking and dragging within the graph. Once a payload has been added, it can be removed by right-clicking on the payload and selecting Delete from the menu. To edit a payload, right-click the payload and select Properties. From the Payload Properties window, the Source, Modulation, and Power Level can be adjusted.

Licenses

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Graphing Vectors

The graph display shows the selected vector(s) in both the time domain and frequency domain.

Time Domain

The time domain graph (upper) shows the digital code amplitude. The x-axes is either time, if the vector is a generated vector, or sample number, if the vector is from a data file. When graphing both a generated vector and a data file in the same window, two X axes will be displayed:

Note that even though the two vectors are drawn on top of each other, they correspond to different X axes, and thus cannot be compared directly.

The minimum and maximum value of the time domain waveform is displayed along the bottom of the graph. These values are useful in ensuring the waveform does not clip.

Frequency Domain

The frequency domain graph (lower), displays the amplitude versus frequency graph of the data. The x-axes displays the absolute frequency for generated vectors, or the relative frequency for data file vectors. The y-axes displays results in dB of Full Scale for generated vectors, and raw code values for data files.

The coupling mode can be selected by the control on the bottom of the graph. For most operations, AC is the preferred choice. For unsigned vectors, this will make no difference. For signed vectors, selecting AC will subtract the vector's average value from each individual point.

Graphing Controls

Pan: Click and Drag to move the graph window
Zoom: Drag a box to select the region to zoom in to
Reset: Reverts the pan and zoom settings to their original values

The range of the axes can also be changed by clicking on the first or last value in the range.

Working with a DPG2

Configuration

A panel is displayed for each DPG2 that is connected. On the left side, the Evaluation Board and Port Configuration can be selected. The Evaluation Board drop-down displays a list of all detected evaluation boards. A “Generic” option is also included, for evaluation boards which do not have a custom interface. The right side of the panel is customized to each evaluation board. The Generic interface is shown above.

To begin, select the Evaluation Board to connect to. If the Evaluation Board is not listed, select Generic. Then select the Port Configuration to use. For Evaluation Boards with custom interfaces, the list of available Port Configurations will only show valid configurations for that board. In some cases, only one Port Configuration will be valid, and will be selected automatically.

Standard Configurations

The following are the standard configurations provided with the DPG2:

NameDescription
LVDS (DCO)LVDS signaling, with the Data Clock delivered to the DPG via the DUT Connector (Extended Logic Levels)
LVDS (DCO) StandardLVDS signaling, with the Data Clock delivered to the DPG via the DUT Connector (Standard Logic Levels)
LVCMOS-3.3V (SMA)3.3V CMOS signaling, with the Data Clock delivered to the DPG via the SMA jacks
LVCMOS-2.5V (SMA)2.5V CMOS signaling, with the Data Clock delivered to the DPG via the SMA jacks
LVCMOS-1.8V (SMA)1.8V CMOS signaling, with the Data Clock delivered to the DPG via the SMA jacks
LVCMOS-3.3V (DCO)3.3V CMOS signaling, with the Data Clock delivered to the DPG via the DUT Connector
LVCMOS-2.5V (DCO)2.5V CMOS signaling, with the Data Clock delivered to the DPG via the DUT Connector
LVCMOS-1.8V (DCO)1.8V CMOS signaling, with the Data Clock delivered to the DPG via the DUT Connector

Multi-DPG Synchronization

Up to four DPG2's can be synchronized with each other. After connecting the DPGs to the Clock Distribution Board, select the mode of each board in the Multi-DPG Synchronization box. When the Master DPG2 begins playback, all the slave units will begin playback as well.

Data Playback

The Data Playback group provides all the controls that work with the data vectors being played from the DPG to the DUT. First, select whether to send two independent vectors (commonly used on dual DACs), or one interleaved vector (used on high-speed single DACs). After adding vectors, select the vectors to use for the I and Q channels. To use only one channel, leave the other channel's selection at None. Vectors that appear with a green check mark next to them are valid for the DPG2. A red X indicates the vector is not valid to use, or may produce unexpected results.

Next, the Play Mode can be selected. Count Mode will play back the selected vectors n (where n is the value in the Count box) times, and then stop. Loop Mode will play the vector continuously. When Loop Mode is selected, the Count box is disabled.

The default Start Offset of 0 tells the DPG2 to being playback at the first record in the data vector. Changing this will alter where the DPG2 begins its playback at.

The Data Width and Alignment options account for Evaluation Boards which are MSB aligned. To use the feature, select the data width, and select MSB Justified. This will cause the DPG2 to shift the data to the left by (16 - Data Width) bits.

The Download Vector(s) to Hardware button downloads the vectors specified above into the DPG2's on-board memory. Depending on the size of the vectors, downloading may take several seconds to several minutes. The progress of the download will be displayed in the Download Progress bar.
The Start/Resume Playback of Vector(s) button begins playback from the DPG2's internal memory to the DUT. If the vector has not been played since it was downloaded, or if the previous play was ended with the Stop command, playback will begin from the address specified in the Start Offset field. If the playback is currently paused, it will resume from the location at which it was paused.
The Pause Playback of Vector(s) button stops the playback of the vector, but does not reset the current vector's position. Playback will resume from the same point at which it was paused.
The Stop Playback of Vector(s) button stops the playback of the vector, and resets the transmit path. This will cause the playback to start from the beginning when the next play command is issued.

Miscellaneous Items

The Data Clock Frequency readout displays the last measured frequency of the data clock provided by the DUT. This is updated approximately once per second.

Frame-Sync Mode allows the secondary Data Clock In (DCI) line to be used as a frame signal, which is required by certain parts.

The Enable SMA Jack as Sync Input option enables the CMOS Clock jacks (J12/13) to be used as a sync input in configurations that do not use the SMA jacks.

The Idle Pattern button opens another screen which allows the user to edit the waveform played out of the DPG while the main data vector isn't being played.

The Advanced/Debug page can be used to upgrade the firmware in the DPG.

Idle Pattern

The Idle Pattern is the vector which is played out of the DPG to the DUT whenever the DPG is not playing a data vector. To enable, check the Enable Idle Pattern box, and fill in the values for the pattern. The pattern will be looped continuously.

Advanced/Debug

The Advanced screen provides low-level debug access to various parts of the DPG. Do not use the Advanced screen unless instructed to do so by Analog Devices.

resources/eval/dpg/dpgdownloader.txt · Last modified: 09 May 2012 19:15 by JasonC